Trading Justice

podcast Join Matt and Tim for their discussion of the Glass Steagall Act and its effect on the consumer. The Glass Steagall Act was a law from 1933 that banned commercial banks (those that you do checking and have an savings account with) from doing any investment banking (securities trading and the like), and vice versa. The Act was put into place as a consumer protection measure to keep commercial banks more conservative in their business actions after the failure of more than 5,000 banks during the Great Depression. Over the years, opponents of the legislation lobbied against the Act, stating it was to restrictive to business and banks' ability to seek revenue. Starting in the 60's, federal regulators started interpreting various actions by commercial and investment banks to be permissible under Glass Steagall that may not have been allowed earlier in the legislation's life cycle such as affiliation between the two and bank underwriting of corporate debt. By the 80's the Act was all but dead, and was fully repealed in 1999. After its repeal, intermingling of commercial and investment banking saw the creation of instruments such as mortgage-backed securities and other complex bundling schemes. You may recognize that as one of the major factors that lead to the 2008 financial crisis. Even with the damage that was done, no further restrictions have been put in place to prevent such an action from happening again. However, there are increasing calls for a form of Glass Steagall to be re-implemented. Whether it will or not remains to be seen, and would likely have to wait until late 2017 at the earliest.   applogoapple logo_0034_stitcher tunein-logo  
Direct download: TJ155GlassSteagall.mp3
Category:Podcasts -- posted at: 3:36pm MST

podcast Join Matt and Tim on the importance of building a team for your personal trading business. With day trading being a solo activity, you may think that there's no need to create a personal team for yourself. It's just you, your computer, and the market, right? Not so much, actually. True, trade execution is all about you making the final call, but why work alone? Trading can be a lonely and draining activity. Being a tweet or forum post away from other fellow traders can take that edge off, as the folks you're posting with know what yer going through, as well. Furtherd iscussing and figuring out new strategies together can be rewarding for all involved. You might think keeping a killer strategy to yourself to prevent it from being overused, but the market is so big, it doesn't really matter.Lastly, you never know where connections may lead. Bridge building can end up introducing you to surprisingly interesting and important people for you.
Not quite sure where to start building your team? A good starting point are mentors. Mentors can serve two purposes: a power hitter on your team for the tricky stuff, and possibly to introduce you to other traders at about your same level the mentor knows themselves to work with. Trading and learning with other folks at your same skill level lends the ability to commiserate about the same struggles you're all going through and share the successes with. To that end, trading workshops (both online and in-person) is also a good place to meet like-minded folks to share ideas with. ...and don't forget Tackle Trading; its forums are full of fellow traders down to talk trade news & strategy, as are the coaches shows.
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Direct download: TJ154PowerTeam.mp3
Category:Podcasts -- posted at: 11:04am MST

podcast Join Tackle Trading's Noah Davidson for a discussion of protective options from Tackle Trading's Cash Flow Club. Options are more than just cash flow generators. While they do indeed do that well when you're the seller, they also act as insurance to the person buying the option (provided the buyer knows what they're doing). Protective options allow a trader to hedge against price volatility for a security or even repair a trade that's gone badly if implemented correctly. Puts and covered calls do generate cash at the cost of capping the maximum amount of profit you can pull from a trade before being exercised by the buyer of the put or call. Done correctly, selling such options also have a high probability of success in generating the expected cash. ...and even if the put or call is exercised, you get the money from the sale all the same to be reallocated elsewhere in your portfolio. However, calls and puts can also help repair trades that have gone badly, lowering the break even point for the trade or occasionally bringing a bad trade back into being a good trade when properly executed. If you'd like to join in on Cash Flow Clubs in person in the future, join Tackle Trading and you'll be able to see all the charting and examples, too! You can join right here! applogoapple logo_0034_stitcher tunein-logo  
Direct download: Tj153ProtectiveOptions.mp3
Category:Podcasts -- posted at: 1:00am MST

podcast Join Producer Phil as he takes you back through a the highlights of a few of the show's past guests. Tackle Trading's had a variety of guests over the past few years, and today, we're highlighting three of them for you. First, Jake Pelly: a trader so adept that he's never had a naked put trade go against him. He also understands the power of compound interest and doesn't let greed get the best of him in pursuing returns. Next, we'll share a bit of time with Clint Coons, a tax expert when it comes to day trading and day traders. Tax season may be over now, but if you're day trading, it's good to give a listen. Lastly, we'll join Tim and George Antone, entrepreneur and author of The Wealthy Code, a book that goes over the concept of money and general mindset in approaching ventures. applogoapple logo_0034_stitcher tunein-logo  
Direct download: TJ151TeamsTradingTaxes.mp3
Category:Podcasts -- posted at: 1:51pm MST

podcast Join Tackle Trading's Gino Poore, Noah Davidson, and Matt Justice as they discuss the impact seasonality has on the markets and how historical market data can make prediction more reliable. In this Coaches Show audio replay, the Tackle Trading coaches cover more than just market conditions and economic news for the week. While market conditions were indeed covered, the focus was seasonality's effect on markets and how historical seasonal data can help make predictive models. Seasonality in trading is much like you may picture the word when it comes to the retail space: certain sectors consistently perform better or worse during specific times of the year. For example, retail tends to pick up toward the end of the year thanks to the rush of holidays that occur. In mid-Spring, it tends to be energy and basic goods that do well; there are no major holidays for a long stretch, and with temperatures switching up, energy consumption increases after the mildness of early Spring. In taking this historical data of sector performance over the years in each month, patterns emerge that carry over from year to year, which makes predicting what may happen in the markets more reliable (but never 100% certain or risk-free). applogoapple logo_0034_stitcher tunein-logo  
Direct download: TJ150DailyRoutine.mp3
Category:Podcasts -- posted at: 3:19pm MST

podcast Join Producer Phil as he takes you back through some of Trading Justice's funnier moments in the podcast. Trading is serious business. Your money is on the line, and treating trading like it's a business is a prudent thing to do in order to keep a clear mindset. However, even in business, there's a time for taking a break. Producer Phil has for you today such a break. He's gone through past podcasts and found funnier moments between Matt, Tim, and their guests to share with you. Come for Matt's theatrical inspirations, stay for the Burning Man stories. applogoapple logo_0034_stitcher tunein-logo  
Direct download: TJ149LighterSideOfTrading.mp3
Category:Podcasts -- posted at: 9:59pm MST

podcast Join Tackle Trading's Gino Poore, Noah Davidson, and Matt Justice as they discuss the impact seasonality has on the markets and how historical market data can make prediction more reliable. In this Coaches Show audio replay, the Tackle Trading coaches cover more than just market conditions and economic news for the week. While market conditions were indeed covered, the focus was seasonality's effect on markets and how historical seasonal data can help make predictive models. Seasonality in trading is much like you may picture the word when it comes to the retail space: certain sectors consistently perform better or worse during specific times of the year. For example, retail tends to pick up toward the end of the year thanks to the rush of holidays that occur. In mid-Spring, it tends to be energy and basic goods that do well; there are no major holidays for a long stretch, and with temperatures switching up, energy consumption increases after the mildness of early Spring. In taking this historical data of sector performance over the years in each month, patterns emerge that carry over from year to year, which makes predicting what may happen in the markets more reliable (but never 100% certain or risk-free). applogoapple logo_0034_stitcher tunein-logo  
Direct download: TJ148Seasonality_Final.mp3
Category:Podcasts -- posted at: 11:57pm MST

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